HOPE FOR AUSTRALIA – TREASURER ON RELIGIOUS LIBERTY

Treasurer’s Speech on Religious Liberty Scott Morrison MP

 Address to the House of Representatives – Marriage amendment,  4th December 2017

“I was amongst the 39 percent that voted for the traditional view of marriage to be maintained. As a nation we must now move forward in grace and love, as my Christian faith teaches us.
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I will respect the democratic outcome of this Australian Marriage survey, both nationally and in my own community, by not standing in the way of this Bill.
However, with the closure of one debate, a new one commences. This new debate is not about opposing same sex marriage, it is about sensibly protecting religious freedoms.
There are almost five million Australians that voted no in this survey who are now coming to terms with the fact that on this issue, they are a minority. That did not used to be the case in the Australia they have lived all or most of their lives in.

They have concerns that their broader views and their broader beliefs are also in the minority and therefore under threat. And they are seeking assurances at this time.
Assurances, rightly or wrongly, that the things that they hold dear are not under threat also because of this change.
On the night of the first referendum to establish our federation in June 1898, Alfred Deakin prayed ‘thy blessing has rested on us here yesterday and we pray that it may be the means of creating and fostering throughout Australia a Christlike citizenship’.
In an earlier speech campaigning in Bendigo for the Federation he quoted a local poet defining the true Australian goal of Federation as for ‘us to arise, united, penitent, and be one people – mighty, serving God’.

Our Constitution went on to proclaim …

WHEREAS the people of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, and Tasmania, humbly relying on the blessing of Almighty God, have agreed to unite in one indissoluble Federal Commonwealth … with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal.
Then in S116 our Constitution deliberately afforded a protection ‘that the Commonwealth shall not make any law .. for prohibiting the free exercise of any religion.’
This is the religious inheritance of our Federation, our Constitution, from more than a century ago. If we ever act in dissonance with these founding principles, it will be to our peril.
This is not to say that Australia is a nation with an established state religion. It is not. We are thankfully free of such a restriction on our liberty.
Such freedom though should not be used as a weapon against the importance of faith, belief and religion in our society, or as a justification to drive faith and religion from our public square. At the same time, protection of religious freedoms cannot be used as a cloak for religious extremism, that undermines our freedoms.
We may be a secular state, but we are not a Godless people to whom faith, belief and religion are not important. Quite the contrary. It is deeply central to the lives of millions of Australians. In my own church, like many others, we refer to Australia as the great south land of the Holy Spirit.
Whether you raise your hands, bow to your knees, face the holy city, light incense, a candle or the menorah, faith matters in this country, and we cannot allow its grace and peace to be diminished, muffled or driven from the public square.
Separation of church and state, does not mean the inoculation of the influence of faith on the state. The State shouldn’t run the church and the church shouldn’t run the State. In fact, separation of church and state was set up to protect the church from the State, not the other way around. To protect religious freedoms.
As I argued in my maiden speech in this place, secularism, secular humanism, is no more our established state religion than any other. It is one of the many free views held by Australians. It holds no special place of authority in our Commonwealth.
For millions of Australians, faith is the unshakeable cornerstone of their lives. It informs their identity and provides a genuine sense of well being. It is the reason why people can look beyond their own circumstances and see a greater purpose. For countless Australians, faith is life.
In my maiden speech to parliament almost ten years ago, I spoke of the two key influences on my life – my family and my faith.
And how my faith in Jesus Christ was inherently personal, not political or preachy. As Christians we do not lay claim to perfection or moral precedence. In fact it is the opposite. Conscious of the frailties and vanities of our own human condition, Christians should be more conscious of the same amongst those around us. This is why faith encourages social responsibility – the bedrock of faith in action…
The fragrance of faith has washed over society for centuries and helped to shape and mould it for the better.

Our own nation was founded, built and undeniably shaped by Christian values, morals and traditions that helped to unite a fledgling country. A nation blessed and formed on Christian conviction. These issues of faith are not only gifted to us by our Federation fathers, but the many generations of Australians who have come to us since, including those from non-Christian faiths and experience… But there was one thing that could never be stripped away, through a millennia of struggle. One thing that sustained these stoic (Maronite)  communities. It wasn’t the governments that came and went with the wind, it wasn’t the leaders that so promised peace. It was their faith.
A faith that routinely stared adversity in the face and prevailed. A faith that held families together. When everything else was a struggle, their faith stood strong. A faith that the hundreds of thousands of Lebanese Maronite Australians brought with them to Australia from as early as the 1860s. But so too did the many Greek Orthodox migrants, Coptic Christians from Egypt, still being persecuted in their home country today, Syrian Christians from both Orthodox and Catholic faiths and Armenians.
And for the many Chinese, Korean and Filipino Australians, of Catholic, Baptist, Anglican, Presbyterian and Pentecostal faiths. Some brought their faith with them, others found it here in Australia.
When most of these migrants came to Australia it was not the Government they first turned to, to assist them to adjust to their new life in Australia. It was their local church or other religious community. If you want to understand the strong opposition to changing our marriage act in western Sydney and elsewhere you must understand the central nature of faith and community to the lives of these and so many other Australians.
Nine out of the top ten electorates that voted No are represented by Labour members, and are comprised of the vibrant faith communities that I have just spoken of.
I would urge them all of these Labour members to be freed up, released from any constraint, that would enable them to stand with their constituents now in supporting amendments that deliver the protections of religious freedoms that are currently absent from this Bill.
To pretend this Bill is whole and satisfies their concerns is to confirm a lack of understanding and empathy for those who hold them.
These Australians are looking for acknowledgement and understanding from this Parliament and their representatives. They are seeking assurance that changes being made to our marriage laws will not undermine the stability, and freedom of their faith and religious expression – what they teach their children, what their children are taught, the values they share and foster within their families, community, within and without their Church walls.
This a reasonable request that this Parliament should support.
commend the PM for initiating the Ruddock Review in protecting religious freedoms. Few people understand these communities and the issues and risks as well as the former Attorney. But that process is not, nor was it designed to be a substitute for sensible action now in this Bill.

To fail to make improvements to this Bill now would demonstrate a failure to appreciate not only the underpinnings of our own liberal democracy and Federation, but the nature of modern multicultural Australia.

I commend my colleagues both in the Senate and this house for standing firm on their convictions and beliefs; both representing their faith and those in their communities that share their values. I will be joining many of my colleagues in supporting amendments to be moved by the Members for Deakin, Mitchell, Canning and Mallee.

I will be joining them in moving amendments to ensure that no organisation can have their public funding or charitable status threatened as a result of holding views that are consistent with the traditional definition of marriage between a man and a woman.

The test of faith is the fruit that it produces. That is what Jesus taught in his parable of the fig tree.

The fruit of faith based organisations has been extraordinary – Mission Australia, Wesley Mission, Caritas, Anglicare, Baptist Care, our religious schools – the many Christian organisations involved in providing pastoral support in our schools – their funding through grants and other programmes and support through our tax system must continue to be about what they achieve, not what they consider to be the definition of marriage.

We need to ensure these protections are put in place.

It is now time to pass a truly inclusive Bill that recognises the views of 100% of Australians, not just the 61%, and I urge the House to not miss this opportunity.

Iranian Christian Converts’ Right to Seek Asylum Can’t Be Denied

Iranian Christian converts must be granted the right to a fair evaluation of danger by European governments before they can be denied asylum and sent back to the Islamic Republic, the top human rights court in Europe ruled last Wednesday.

Apostasy from Islam is considered a criminal offence that is punishable by death.

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                                                                    (Photo: Reuters/Yannis Behrakis)
A stranded Iranian woman cries as she embraces a Christian colleague who just had his mouth sewed shut during a protest at the Greek-Macedonian border near the Greek village of Idomeni, November 26, 2015. Countries along the Balkan route taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants seeking refuge in western Europe last week began filtering the flow, granting passage only to those fleeing conflict in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.
On the ABC 7.30 Report: the Refugee Council’s CEO, Paul Power has accused Australia of “cherry picking” Middle Eastern refugees to be resettled in Australia. Mr Power said it was wrong to respond to the Syrian refugee crisis with a programme that prioritizes persecuted minorities, when the vast majority of Syria’s nearly 5 million refugees are Muslim – many who have suffered their own persecution at the hands of the Assad regime and Shia militias because they are Sunnis.
I hope Malcolm Turnbull remains firm on his decision to give persecuted Christians priority over Muslims, as there is no doubt they are not accepted in any Muslim country, let alone go back to the Muslim country from which they came. The government did not reveal to the 7.30 Report where the extra 12,000 refugees will come from.
If you agree that Christians should receive priority, write to your local member to support Malcolm Turnbull’s original decision to give priority to persecuted Christians and other minority groups.

National Solemn Assembly Gathering in Canberra October 24th & 25th, 2016

Assembly-Logo-NS

Go to the website http://www.nationalsolemnassembly.com and register. This a must event for all Christians praying for revival in  this nation.

The 40 Days of Prayer and Fasting movement and the amazing testimonies by forty of our indigenous Christian brothers and sisters has demonstrated that God is using them to bring about a move of the Holy Spirit in our Nation that will transform it for His purposes.

The National Solemn Assembly Gathering, being organised by Indigenous Christian leaders from around Australia, in Canberra, in October of this year, is a KEY event to bring together Christians from all denominations, the remnant to be used for HIS purposes in this final hour of human history. Please get this message distributed as widely as possible to your praying Christian relatives and friends.

Make sure you watch Peter Walkers’s video and the other testimonies on 40 Days of Prayer & Fasting.

Help solve the refugee crisis – 7 Steps Aussie’s can take.

This article by David Leyonhjelm, Contributor, The Daily Reckoning makes a worthwhile contribution to the problem. I am sure you won’t agree with all of his suggestions but it will challenge most of us.

“Calls to solve the Middle East refugee crisis have been loud but vague; so here’s my guide to dealing with the situation compassionately and effectively.

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Invite a refugee family to stay at your place: Contact the Refugee Council, Uniting Church or Red Cross to offer your spare room to someone in need. After all, just going to a rally or signing a petition is a bit vacuous. When you said, ‘welcome more refugees’, didn’t that mean you would welcome them? Or did you think that someone else would do it?

Employ a refugee, or let someone else do so: Most refugees want to work. If you’re not in a position to offer a job, don’t prevent others from doing so. Many lack the language or skills to jump straight into a $17.29 an hour gig, yet would gladly take a job that pays more than welfare. Exempt refugees from the minimum wage. Many Australians who dislike welfare-dependent refugees would be more welcoming if they paid their way via employment.

Cut foreign aid: Doubling our refugee intake would cost a billion dollars, but if we cut foreign aid by the same amount, taxpayers who worry about the cost of helping foreigners would have nothing to complain about. We’d still fund short-term humanitarian assistance, because cutting a billion dollars from foreign aid still leaves billions more. And we’d do more good for foreigners by bringing them here than channelling cash to corrupt local elites.

Think global, act local: While there are millions fleeing the Middle East, there are also millions fleeing trouble spots closer to home — Burma, Sri Lanka and Vietnam. Taking refugees from our region would do as much good as from Syria (although persecuted Christians from Syria should be fast tracked*). And realistically, we have more capacity to assimilate Buddhists, Hindus and Christians to our way of life and liberal democracy than we do Muslims.

Let economic refugees pay to get here: Plenty are fleeing their homelands because of mayhem and poverty, not persecution. Instead of them paying people smugglers to get here, and our Government then paying the people smugglers to send them back, we should accept economic refugees for a fee — to prove to sceptical taxpayers that economic refugees need not be a budget burden, and would ensure those most able to hit the ground running in the workplace are the ones who choose to make Australia home.

Let people in as interim second-class residents: Australians would accept a much higher intake, if migrants did not immediately have access to taxpayer‑funded welfare, healthcare, housing and education as citizens. They would also accept a much higher intake if the hurdle to obtain citizenship were higher. Some will argue that they don’t want a two-tiered system in Australia, but if we ask potential migrants if they want to come even without access to our social welfare system, I’m pretty sure what most would say.

Be the best we can be: Economic development and growth isn’t just in our own interest. It means we can afford to be the most altruistic country on the planet. So listen to those who want to approve developments, cut red tape, remove industry protectionism, and get resources out of the public sector into the private sector: they’re the most compassionate Aussies around.”

* comment by me

Read Why Vern Gowdie wrote END OF AUSTRALIA

Dear Ronald,
Making dire and what appear to be apocalyptic predictions on the future of Australia contrasts with my normal optimistic disposition.
However, after a decade of research and analysis, the reality is what it is.
There’s no point trying to gloss over the overwhelming evidence that we are in the midst of the greatest debt crisis in history by saying ‘she’ll be right mate’.
Of course, this would be a far more comforting message, but one that would be highly irresponsible.
Government, institutional economists, real estate agents, share brokers and financial planners are not going to tell you anything other than ‘she’ll be right’. Why?
For two reasons.
Firstly, I think the majority have absolutely no idea how we have arrived at this point of no return.
They think going deeper and deeper into debt is normal. After all this is the way it has been for all their adult lives. They point to the world’s recovery since 2008 and genuinely think central bankers have figured out how to save the world with printed dollars. Why worry? The Fed has our backs. In simple terms, they are clueless.
Secondly, and I think far more immoral, are the minority that realise the system is a giant Ponzi scheme but have no intention of revealing the economic fraud and endangering their capacity to milk this sham for all its worth. The insiders have their parachute strategy in place and will have taken the necessary precautions to protect their wealth while the masses (as usual) suffer the horrific financial consequences.
The Australia of my childhood is a world away from the Australia I see today. We have embraced the great Australian dream of property ownership (plus a few more rental prop¬erties thrown in for good measure) irrespective of the level of indebtedness this ‘dream’ requires. More credit is used to furnish the ‘dream’ with the latest mod cons, pool and land¬scaped yard. Gone are the backyard ‘test matches’ and rugby league ‘grand finals’.
The bank managers of yesteryear were prudent and not afraid to say ‘no’ to those they considered less than credit worthy.
Since the 1980s the banking industry has prospered more than any other sector of the economy. The simple formula for the banks’ success has been fractional banking — the ability to charge interest on money that does not exist.
The more money central banks conjure up out of thin air,
the more profit banks make…
The proliferation of ‘funny money’ has been a game changer for the banking industry. That’s why the big four banks occupy the top five places in the All Ordinaries Index. The once honourable profession of banking has been reduced to an industry of ‘product floggers’.
The bank managers of old who failed to adapt to this new aggressive approach of meeting sales targets, were shown the door. This new age banking model may be highly profitable, but it has also made the financial system highly vulnerable.
When the next crisis hits and banks buckle, questions are going to be asked as to how we let this sector become so dominant. Sorry, but this will be too little, too late. The bank execs who oversaw this flawed business model have taken their bonuses and run.
With three adult children of my own, I often reflect on the differ¬ence in my starting position at their age. Housing was far more affordable based on a multiple of household income, there was an abundance of employment opportunities, and we didn’t have student loans. By comparison, life seemed a little easier.
Ironically I feel the coming collapse will, in the fullness of time, be seen as a positive for the younger generation…the ones who are not overly indebted with loans for overpriced houses.
Hitting the reset button on the global economy may, in the longer run, produce a couple of obvious positives.
Property becomes more affordable. And a culture of prudence and respect for money is restored to society (much like my parents had from their experiences during The Great Depression and the Second World War).
The continued accumulation of debt over many decades has influenced government entitlement policy, financial markets, economic growth and our attitude toward money. Nearly every aspect of our lives has in some way been directly or indirectly impacted by a multi-decade long credit-fuelled consumption binge.
For example, would we have so many factories in China pouring out tonnes of pollutants if we in the western world had acted with restraint in our purchasing habits? Probably not. Indirectly, climate change is a result of our love affair with debt.
To combat climate change, governments are all now thinking of implementing various (costly) carbon reduction schemes. Perhaps when the next crisis hits, these schemes won’t be neces¬sary, as a good number of the factories will cease to operate.
The views I have expressed in this book have been ones I have held for a number years.
The risk with publicly stating your views well in advance of a potential crisis is you invite calls of the boy who cried wolf.
The more time that passes and nothing happens, the louder the calls become.
The one thing I have learnt over the years is that you cannot time markets. Vested interests, powerful media messages and momentum can delay the inevitable outcome for much longer than you might think possible. This is when patience is required.
Sir Isaac Newton, to his great cost, learnt this lesson in 1720. Newton invested in the South Sea Company in early 1720 and sold out several months later for a handsome profit. Rather than take his profit and wait for the South Sea bubble to burst, he could not resist the lure of a market that continued to rise. Impatience got the better of him. A few months later he bought back in — at three times his original buy-in price — and the rest as the say ‘is history’. The bubble burst and Newton lost his life savings of 20,000 pounds (about $3 million in today’s dollars).
With plenty of time to think about his losses, Newton mused, ‘I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men.’
The GFC was warning us of the madness of continued debt accumulation. The central bankers drowned out this message with printed dollars and suppressed interest rates.
The madness continued…the world is US$60 trillion
further in debt than it was in 2008
Once again the market will call time on this madness. Next time the message will be so loud and so clear central bankers will be rendered impotent to stop the market from doing what it should have done in 2008.
Yes, I have been early on my forecasts. So be it. The Fed has paid an extremely high price to buy seven years of ‘calm’. I did not anticipate this level of intervention…it has been, like a lot of things since 2008, without precedent.
Investing in cash is the equivalent of Noah’s Ark. When the markets wash away all in front of them, your Ark of cash will float above the flood that rages below. But you must build your ark before it rains. They mocked Noah, but he had the last laugh. Take the time now to get your house in order. Follow some simple rules.
If you have debt, make a determined effort to pay it down more quickly than you otherwise would have.
Do your budget, and learn to live within your income.
If you have investments and/or superannuation, move at least some, if not all, into cash. Take profits voluntarily now rather than be forced to realise losses later.
Above all, be patient. These things can and do take a long time to play out. Above all, be patient. These things can and do take a long time to play out.
Finally, I hope this book has been of assistance to you in formulating your strategy to not only survive but eventually prosper from The End of Australia.
As dire as the current situation is, I believe the end will pave the way for a new beginning. An Australia that’s not addicted to debt. A nation where our children and grandchildren no longer have to bear the burden of our over indulgences.

VERN, YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND, THAT UNLESS THIS NATION REPENTS AND RECOGNIZES GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY, JUDGEMENT WILL COME.

 

Could this be the END OF AUSTRALIA as we know it?

The End of Australia

Well, Vern Gowdie of Port Phillip Publishing thinks so. Port Philip Publishing was established in 2005 as the Australian outpost of US publisher, Agora Inc. Agora was founded over 25 years ago by best-selling author and entrepreneur Bill Bonner, and is one of the world’s most successful publishers of financial, health and travel newsletters.

Vern’s book THE END of AUSTRALIA is currently available FREE from Port Philip Publishing to subscribers of one of their Financial Services.

Vern firmly believes Australia is headed for the greatest collapse since The Great Depression.

Remarkably the exact week that THE END OF AUSTRALIA was released the great market reversal predicted in the book began. And it has continued just as Vern predicted with the selling led by the banks.

Not even the new Prime Minister could stop the fall. The ASX 200 index closed another 78 points, or 1.5% down. The average Australian share portfolio is now 16% lower than it was just five months ago.

Vern says that is just the beginning. “Far, far greater losses are to follow for investors who fail to take evasive action now.” He says, it won’t happen in a straight line as the Central Banks will do their utmost to stop it. The financial industry will deny it to the end. American stocks are rallying as I write this post and Australian stocks may follow tomorrow but the crash is inevitable says Vern and I agree with him.

As Christians we understand that almost everything is being shaken and at risk – the economic, environmental and social fabric of society is deteriorating. God has called us to be part of the solution for this time! We need to be like the men of Issachar who understood the times and seek God’s YES for our personal and working life.

 

 

Liberal Party decision has protected Australia from God’s judgment

Tony Abbott made a courageous, God honouring stand, to ensure there is no change to the Marriage Act in his term of Parliament. Nor can we forget the other 65 members that supported him.

Sadly the young activists supporting same sex marriage shown in the picture below marching in Brisbane August 8th, 2015 have no fear and knowledge of the one true God.

Same sex marriage

God is sovereign over nations. History shows that he uses nations for His purposes, raising up and deposing leaders, at will. King Nebuchadnezzar, greatest king of ancient Babylon (Daniel 2), is a good example as is King Cyrus (Cyrus the Great) founder of the Persian Empire (2 Chronicles 36:22) whom God used to bring the Jews back to Jerusalem and rebuild the temple.

These young people therefore have no understanding that Tony Abbott’s decision protected Australia from further judgment by God.

As the consequences of changing the Marriage Act in countries such as Canada, UK, Ireland and the USA unfold, including persecution of Christians who hold to God’s ordained role of marriage, hopefully Australia will remain a beacon of light, blessed by our Almighty God.

The church of Australia needs to understand what a blessing we have been given and therefore responsibility to pray for and support our Christian brothers and sisters in all the domains but particularly Government. As well as Tony Abbott, Glen Stevens, Governor of the Reserve Bank comes to mind, as does Mike Baird, Premier of N.S.W., all three are staunch Christians.