“END TIMES” – TOTAL REJECTION OF GOD’S CREATED ORDER

I am otherworldly’: Ex-transgender man, 33, who now identifies as an ‘agender ALIEN’ reveals they have had their nipples and eyebrows REMOVED to look ‘less human’

Extraterrestrial: The 33-year-old has gone as far as having surgery to remove their nipples in order to make them appear 'less human' 

  • Jareth Nebula was born a woman but then transitioned to a man when they were 29-years-old 
  • The Washington-native, who works as a barber’s shop receptionist, said after transitioning into a man, they still didn’t feel right  
  • The 33-year-old said they didn’t ‘feel comfortable’ as either gender
  • Therefore, when Jareth learned about the term agender – which translates to without gender – they applied this to themselves
  • Jareth decided to refer to themselves as an agender alien, and now sports a totally new alien-like look 
  • In order to appear ‘less human’, Jareth has had their nipples removed, and sports a number of facial piercings and wears alien-like makeup looks   
  • Jareth is agender, and prefers to be referred to with the pronoun ‘they’ 

    According to the Mirror, Jareth, who identifies as agender – which translates to ‘without gender’ – and prefers to be referred to with the pronoun they, named himself after the character played by David Bowie in the 1986 musical fantasy Labyrinth.

    Unlike the term gender-fluid – which refers to a person’s whose gender identity is not fixed, or a person who feel they are a mix of both genders – agender typically refers to being gender-less, without a gender, or gender neutral.

    Explaining their transition journey, Jareth said: ‘After coming out as transgender and believing I had finally found myself, I realised I was wrong – I wasn’t male or female, or even human.

    ‘I don’t think or feel like humans. I can’t really explain it to others – I’m simply otherworldly.

    ‘I didn’t feel comfortable as either gender or even anything in between. I know I’m stuck in a human form and that’s how I’m perceived by others – but to me, I’m an alien with no gender,’ he added.

    ‘I thought being a trans man would solve all of my issues and inner battles with finding out who I was, but I wasn’t as happy as I expected to be,’ they said.

    ‘I felt like I was trying to fit into someone else’s box. I didn’t want to be constrained – that’s when I discovered what agender was.

    ‘I’d always been obsessed with aliens, too, and what it means to be extraterrestrial, so the idea of being an agender alien fit perfectly as an identity for me,’ they added.

    ‘People treat me like a freak because I’m an alien, but it’s a completely valid thing to call yourself,’ Jareth explained.

    ‘Who is anyone to tell you who you can or can’t be? If someone wants to identify as anything, even an animal, let them.  

    ‘I feel sorry for people who attack me online. I think they lack empathy and just want to target me, so I deal with it pretty well by brushing it off.

    Jareth added: I’m happy with who I am and will continue to become more alien-like every day.’ “everyone did what was right in his own eyes” Judges 21:25

EVIL IN THE LAST DAYS

Why should we be surprised with events such as Nikolas Cruz, the 19-year-old shooter who gunned down 17 people last week at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Cruz was educated by an American educational system that has completely rejected God, His statues and His ways. Supreme Court decisions, one by one removed prayer, the Ten Commandments, and moral objectivity from the education system, leaving people, such as Cruz, to do what’s right in their own eyes.

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed by shooter Nikolas Cruz last week, have organised a protest event against the “pitiful, pathetic” failures of politicians to tackle school violence. The students created the website March For Our Lives, with the protest event scheduled for March 24 in Washington, D.C., and have declared that since politicians have failed them, it is up to them to demand real change in America. However, political activism will not solve the problem.

Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the teenage killers behind the Columbine High School shooting in 1992, made a video before the massacre at the time, declaring that whoever goes against their beliefs, dies. The moral revolution came full circle. Remove God, and violence filled the void. America has found itself in a downward spiral because its schools have systemically been removing God, and replacing the void with violence, drugs, and sex. Moreover, metal detectors can’t fix evil hearts. Safe spaces don’t heal troubled minds. Political correctness doesn’t create better kids.

Our consciences testify that human beings are moral agents, capable of both good and evil. And the spirit inside each of us longs for moral wrongs to be made right, regardless of how many public educators deny this transcendent moral truth.

Banning guns will not fix the problem, only Jesus can penetrate the most hardened hearts. We’ll still have trouble in this world until Christ returns. Jesus told us that in the “last days” lawlessness will abound, and sadly, the love of many will grow cold (Matthew 24:12). Folks time is short. Are you in a church that understands we are in the “last days” and is equipping disciples to face tribulation and to obey God’s call on their lives?

HOPE FOR AUSTRALIA – TREASURER ON RELIGIOUS LIBERTY

Treasurer’s Speech on Religious Liberty Scott Morrison MP

 Address to the House of Representatives – Marriage amendment,  4th December 2017

“I was amongst the 39 percent that voted for the traditional view of marriage to be maintained. As a nation we must now move forward in grace and love, as my Christian faith teaches us.
Image result for picture of Scott Morrison in Parliament giving speech
I will respect the democratic outcome of this Australian Marriage survey, both nationally and in my own community, by not standing in the way of this Bill.
However, with the closure of one debate, a new one commences. This new debate is not about opposing same sex marriage, it is about sensibly protecting religious freedoms.
There are almost five million Australians that voted no in this survey who are now coming to terms with the fact that on this issue, they are a minority. That did not used to be the case in the Australia they have lived all or most of their lives in.

They have concerns that their broader views and their broader beliefs are also in the minority and therefore under threat. And they are seeking assurances at this time.
Assurances, rightly or wrongly, that the things that they hold dear are not under threat also because of this change.
On the night of the first referendum to establish our federation in June 1898, Alfred Deakin prayed ‘thy blessing has rested on us here yesterday and we pray that it may be the means of creating and fostering throughout Australia a Christlike citizenship’.
In an earlier speech campaigning in Bendigo for the Federation he quoted a local poet defining the true Australian goal of Federation as for ‘us to arise, united, penitent, and be one people – mighty, serving God’.

Our Constitution went on to proclaim …

WHEREAS the people of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, and Tasmania, humbly relying on the blessing of Almighty God, have agreed to unite in one indissoluble Federal Commonwealth … with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal.
Then in S116 our Constitution deliberately afforded a protection ‘that the Commonwealth shall not make any law .. for prohibiting the free exercise of any religion.’
This is the religious inheritance of our Federation, our Constitution, from more than a century ago. If we ever act in dissonance with these founding principles, it will be to our peril.
This is not to say that Australia is a nation with an established state religion. It is not. We are thankfully free of such a restriction on our liberty.
Such freedom though should not be used as a weapon against the importance of faith, belief and religion in our society, or as a justification to drive faith and religion from our public square. At the same time, protection of religious freedoms cannot be used as a cloak for religious extremism, that undermines our freedoms.
We may be a secular state, but we are not a Godless people to whom faith, belief and religion are not important. Quite the contrary. It is deeply central to the lives of millions of Australians. In my own church, like many others, we refer to Australia as the great south land of the Holy Spirit.
Whether you raise your hands, bow to your knees, face the holy city, light incense, a candle or the menorah, faith matters in this country, and we cannot allow its grace and peace to be diminished, muffled or driven from the public square.
Separation of church and state, does not mean the inoculation of the influence of faith on the state. The State shouldn’t run the church and the church shouldn’t run the State. In fact, separation of church and state was set up to protect the church from the State, not the other way around. To protect religious freedoms.
As I argued in my maiden speech in this place, secularism, secular humanism, is no more our established state religion than any other. It is one of the many free views held by Australians. It holds no special place of authority in our Commonwealth.
For millions of Australians, faith is the unshakeable cornerstone of their lives. It informs their identity and provides a genuine sense of well being. It is the reason why people can look beyond their own circumstances and see a greater purpose. For countless Australians, faith is life.
In my maiden speech to parliament almost ten years ago, I spoke of the two key influences on my life – my family and my faith.
And how my faith in Jesus Christ was inherently personal, not political or preachy. As Christians we do not lay claim to perfection or moral precedence. In fact it is the opposite. Conscious of the frailties and vanities of our own human condition, Christians should be more conscious of the same amongst those around us. This is why faith encourages social responsibility – the bedrock of faith in action…
The fragrance of faith has washed over society for centuries and helped to shape and mould it for the better.

Our own nation was founded, built and undeniably shaped by Christian values, morals and traditions that helped to unite a fledgling country. A nation blessed and formed on Christian conviction. These issues of faith are not only gifted to us by our Federation fathers, but the many generations of Australians who have come to us since, including those from non-Christian faiths and experience… But there was one thing that could never be stripped away, through a millennia of struggle. One thing that sustained these stoic (Maronite)  communities. It wasn’t the governments that came and went with the wind, it wasn’t the leaders that so promised peace. It was their faith.
A faith that routinely stared adversity in the face and prevailed. A faith that held families together. When everything else was a struggle, their faith stood strong. A faith that the hundreds of thousands of Lebanese Maronite Australians brought with them to Australia from as early as the 1860s. But so too did the many Greek Orthodox migrants, Coptic Christians from Egypt, still being persecuted in their home country today, Syrian Christians from both Orthodox and Catholic faiths and Armenians.
And for the many Chinese, Korean and Filipino Australians, of Catholic, Baptist, Anglican, Presbyterian and Pentecostal faiths. Some brought their faith with them, others found it here in Australia.
When most of these migrants came to Australia it was not the Government they first turned to, to assist them to adjust to their new life in Australia. It was their local church or other religious community. If you want to understand the strong opposition to changing our marriage act in western Sydney and elsewhere you must understand the central nature of faith and community to the lives of these and so many other Australians.
Nine out of the top ten electorates that voted No are represented by Labour members, and are comprised of the vibrant faith communities that I have just spoken of.
I would urge them all of these Labour members to be freed up, released from any constraint, that would enable them to stand with their constituents now in supporting amendments that deliver the protections of religious freedoms that are currently absent from this Bill.
To pretend this Bill is whole and satisfies their concerns is to confirm a lack of understanding and empathy for those who hold them.
These Australians are looking for acknowledgement and understanding from this Parliament and their representatives. They are seeking assurance that changes being made to our marriage laws will not undermine the stability, and freedom of their faith and religious expression – what they teach their children, what their children are taught, the values they share and foster within their families, community, within and without their Church walls.
This a reasonable request that this Parliament should support.
commend the PM for initiating the Ruddock Review in protecting religious freedoms. Few people understand these communities and the issues and risks as well as the former Attorney. But that process is not, nor was it designed to be a substitute for sensible action now in this Bill.

To fail to make improvements to this Bill now would demonstrate a failure to appreciate not only the underpinnings of our own liberal democracy and Federation, but the nature of modern multicultural Australia.

I commend my colleagues both in the Senate and this house for standing firm on their convictions and beliefs; both representing their faith and those in their communities that share their values. I will be joining many of my colleagues in supporting amendments to be moved by the Members for Deakin, Mitchell, Canning and Mallee.

I will be joining them in moving amendments to ensure that no organisation can have their public funding or charitable status threatened as a result of holding views that are consistent with the traditional definition of marriage between a man and a woman.

The test of faith is the fruit that it produces. That is what Jesus taught in his parable of the fig tree.

The fruit of faith based organisations has been extraordinary – Mission Australia, Wesley Mission, Caritas, Anglicare, Baptist Care, our religious schools – the many Christian organisations involved in providing pastoral support in our schools – their funding through grants and other programmes and support through our tax system must continue to be about what they achieve, not what they consider to be the definition of marriage.

We need to ensure these protections are put in place.

It is now time to pass a truly inclusive Bill that recognises the views of 100% of Australians, not just the 61%, and I urge the House to not miss this opportunity.